Weegee

May 14, 2012 § Leave a comment

 


Weegee was the pseudonym of Arthur Fellig (June 12, 1899 – December 26, 1968), a photographer and photojournalist, known for his stark black and white street photography. Weegee worked in the Lower East Side of New York City as a press photographer during the 1930s and ’40s, and he developed his signature style by following the city’s emergency services and documenting their activity. Much of his work depicted unflinchingly realistic scenes of urban life, crime, injury and death. Weegee published photographic books and also worked in cinema, initially making his own short films and later collaborating with film directors such as Jack Donohue and Stanley Kubrick.

In Gordon Theisen’s book, Staying Up Much Too Late, he analyzes Fellig’s work as an example of art as a craft: “They [the photos] glisten with anguish and, taken as a group, provide a powerful vision of the most modern of cities as a modern inferno, where anything but especially death – whether accidental or resulting from passion or ruthless calculation – can happen anywhere, on any corner” (Theisen 50).

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