Photographer Leonardo Henrichsen filming his death. (Chile, 1973)

June 30, 2013 § Leave a comment

SVT enlisted Henrichsen, who had covered 14 violent coups for their current events program, Rapport, to their bureau in Santiago, Chile. Working with chief correspondent Jan Sandquist, his first assignment there was during a massive, October 1972 truckers’ strike in protest over the program of expropriations being advanced by Chile’s Socialist President, Salvador Allende.On the morning of June 29, 1973, the day of the attempted military coup known as the Tanquetazo, as Henrichsen had breakfast at the café in the Hotel Crillón (across La Moneda Presidential Palace in downtown Santiago), the sound of gunfire erupted outside, leading him and Sandquist to rush to cover the event. As he began filming, a detachment in a mutineering army regiment attempting to storm La Moneda Palace attacked protesters and bystanders nearby and, noticing him and his camera, the ranking officer, Corporal Héctor Bustamante Gómez shot his pistol at Henrichsen, prompting his men to fire, as well. Appealing to them that they cease firing at two journalists, Henrichsen was struck by the third shot (from an as yet unidentified conscript), causing him to collapse in Sandquist’s arms while still filming. He was 33.
Wikipedia

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The Portraitist

December 8, 2012 § Leave a comment

The Portraitist, a film by  Irek Dobrowolski

The Portraitist is a 2005 Polish television documentary film about the life and work of Wilhelm Brasse, the famous “photographer of Auschwitz”, made for TVP1, Poland, which first aired in its “Proud to Present” series on January 1, 2006.[1] It also premiered at the Polish Film Festival, at the West London Synagogue, in London, on March 19, 2007.

Album of Paris Crime Scenes

August 28, 2012 § Leave a comment

Attributed to Alphonse Bertillon  (French, 1853–1914)

Alphonse Bertillon, the chief of criminal identification for the Paris police department, developed the mug shot format and other photographic procedures used by police to register criminals. Although the images in this extraordinary album of forensic photographs were made by or under the direction of Bertillon, it was probably assembled by a private investigator or secretary who worked at the Paris prefecture. Photographs of the pale bodies of murder victims are assembled with views of the rooms where the murders took place, close-ups of objects that served as clues, and mug shots of criminals and suspects. Made as part of an archive rather than as art, these postmortem portraits, recorded in the deadpan style of a police report, nonetheless retain an unsettling potency.

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Peter Fechter, one of the first victims of the Berlin Wall

August 17, 2012 § Leave a comment

Peter Fechter (14 January 1944 – 17 August 1962) was a German bricklayer from Berlin in what became East Germany in 1945. He was 18 when he became one of the first victims of the Berlin Wall’s border guards while trying to cross over to what was then West Berlin.

Weegee

May 14, 2012 § Leave a comment

 


Weegee was the pseudonym of Arthur Fellig (June 12, 1899 – December 26, 1968), a photographer and photojournalist, known for his stark black and white street photography. Weegee worked in the Lower East Side of New York City as a press photographer during the 1930s and ’40s, and he developed his signature style by following the city’s emergency services and documenting their activity. Much of his work depicted unflinchingly realistic scenes of urban life, crime, injury and death. Weegee published photographic books and also worked in cinema, initially making his own short films and later collaborating with film directors such as Jack Donohue and Stanley Kubrick.

In Gordon Theisen’s book, Staying Up Much Too Late, he analyzes Fellig’s work as an example of art as a craft: “They [the photos] glisten with anguish and, taken as a group, provide a powerful vision of the most modern of cities as a modern inferno, where anything but especially death – whether accidental or resulting from passion or ruthless calculation – can happen anywhere, on any corner” (Theisen 50).

Tatort Effekt 1

January 29, 2012 § Leave a comment

(c) connie mendoza

Tatort (English title: Crime Scene) is a long-running German/Austrian/Swiss (ARD (since 1970), ORF (since 1972) and SF (1990–2001, again since 2011)), crime television series set in various parts of these countries. The show is broadcast on the channels of ARD (DasErste, (reruns on regional ARD stations)) in Germany, ORF 2 in Austria and SF1 in Switzerland. The first episode was broadcast on November 29, 1970. The opening sequence for the series has remained the same throughout the decades, which remains highly unusual for any such long-running TV series up to date.

Each of the regional TV channels which together form ARD, plus ORF and SF, produces its own episodes, starring its own police inspector (or team of inspectors), some of which, like the discontinued Schimanski (played by Götz George), have become cultural icons.

The show appears on DasErste (ARD) and ORF 2 on Sundays at 8:15 p.m. (SF1 starts 10 minutes earlier) and currently about 30 episodes are made per year. As of May 2011, 800 episodes in total have been produced. [Wikipedia]

La Rabbia – Pier Paolo Pasolini

September 29, 2011 § Leave a comment

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